Connect and engage voters

A complex society

Trust in government and in politicians has decreased in many nations. 

However, the first signs of decreasing voter turnout occurred in the early 1960s, which was before the major upheavals of the late 1960s and 1970s. Robert D. Putnam argues that the collapse in civil engagement is due to the introduction of television. In the 1950s and 1960s, television quickly became the main leisure activity in developed nations. It replaced earlier more social entertainments such as bridge clubs, church groups, and bowling leagues. Putnam argues that as people retreated within their homes and general social participation declined so too did voting. Rosenstone and Hansen contend that the decline in turnout is the product of a change in campaigning strategies as a result of the so-called new media.

Before the introduction of television, almost all of a party's resources would be directed towards intensive local campaigning and get out the vote initiatives. In the modern era, these resources have been redirected to expensive media campaigns in which the potential voter is a passive participant. During the same period, negative campaigning has become ubiquitous in the United States and elsewhere and has been shown to impact voter turnout.  Attack ads and smear campaigns give voters a negative impression of the entire political process. The evidence for this is mixed: elections involving highly unpopular incumbents generally have high turnout; some studies have found that mudslinging and character attacks reduce turnout, but that substantive attacks on a party's record can increase it

The decline in voter turnout is almost wholly concentrated among non-seniors. Those who began voting prior to 1960 maintain the same high turnout rates of that era. For each subsequent generation, starting with the one that came of age in the 1960s, turnout has steadily declined. Recent programs to increase the rates of voting among young people—such as MTV's "Rock the Vote" and the "Vote or Die" initiatives in the United States—may have marginally increased turnouts of those between the ages of 18 and 25 to vote.  A number of governments and electoral commissions have also launched efforts to boost turnout. For instance Elections Canada has launched mass media campaigns to encourage voting prior to elections, as have bodies in Taiwan and the United Kingdom. Clearly engageing the electorate is the key.


 1763,    08  Apr  2017 ,   Communication
Public Democracy

Website: publicgroup.com.au

The Public Group is an organisation supporting elected representatives in their mission to be responsive to and informed about the opinions, needs and wishes of their constituents. The Public Group have developed and support the online platform Public-Democracy - cutting edge communication technology which can turn your database into a powerful tool for connecting with, engaging with and measuring your demographics and allow you to monetize your membership or fanbase.. The Public Group have acquired one of the largest databases (114 million verified users)  in the USA enabling access to over half the voting age population. Apart from it's primary focus of using digital connectivity technology to enhance the democratic process, the Public Group has identitifed a range of other channels in which their innovative product and Big Data asset can be utilized including sporting groups, unions and other large membership based organisations.

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